Thomson replaces Vito for Ireland Test

first_imgCommenting on the All Blacks return to Christchurch, Hansen said: “It’s great that Test footy has returned to Christchurch and the players are looking forward to playing in front of a sell-out crowd. The team, especially those of us from Christchurch, know that people have still been doing it tough so hopefully we can give them a performance on Saturday that puts a smile on their faces.”New Zealand v IrelandSaturday, 16 June 2012 at AMI Stadium, ChristchurchKick:off – 08:35 BST CHRISTCHURCH, NEW ZEALAND – JUNE 12: Adam Thomson of the All Blacks and Dan Carter look on during a New Zealand All Blacks training session at Linfield Park on June 12, 2012 in Christchurch, New Zealand. (Photo by Martin Hunter/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Starting XV:15. Israel Dagg, 14. Zac Guildford, 13. Conrad Smith, 12. Sonny Bill Williams, 11. Julian Savea, 10. Daniel Carter, 9. Aaron Smith, 1. Tony Woodcock, 2. Andrew Hore, 3. Owen Franks, 4. Brodie Retallick, 5. Samuel Whitelock, 6. Adam Thomson, 7. Richie McCaw (C), 8. Kieran ReadReplacements:16. Hikawera Elliot, 17. Ben Franks, 18. Ali Williams, 19. Sam Cane *, 20. Piri Weepu, 21. Aaron Cruden, 22. Ben Smith * denotes a new cap Canes’ try-scorer Adam Thomson finally gets his startTHE STARTING XV features just the one change with loose forward Adam Thomson replacing the injured Victor Vito (knee) at blindside flanker, while his place on the bench has been taken by new cap Sam Cane.All Blacks Head Coach Steve Hansen said, despite last week’s first Test win over the Irish, there had still been a lot for the All Blacks to work on this week.“Once again, for us it’s about our preparation, getting clarity early in the week and building in intensity so we can have a performance we can all be proud of on Saturday. We (the coaches) are expecting further improvements in our game due to the extra training and preparation time we have had together, along with having a game under our belt.“We are also expecting Ireland to improve, as they are a nation with a ‘never-say-die’ attitude so what we did last time won’t be good enough.”last_img read more

Wales v Australia: The Preview

first_imgBy this final game of the Autumn Series, there are eleven Welsh squad members unavailable to the coaches, nine of which are injured. Five of those nine have been felled in the brutal games against Samoa and New Zealand, with Bradley Davies, still out of action after Andrew Hore’s forearm smash last week. The final two, unavailable to Wales are James Hook (Perpignan) and Paul James (Bath) as the game falls outside the international window. Australia are only in slightly better shape, even though they are missing a gamut of stars in James Horwill, Will Genia, James O’Connor, and Quade Cooper for very different reasons. Deans admits it’s been one long season, they’ll be glad to finish.Prediction: I’m going for Wales to sneak it by three points, 20-17. Why? Because Wales have had a pitiful autumn and they’re a better side than results suggest. Australia will want to send Nathan Sharpe off with a win before he takes his place  as one of the greatest locks of his generation, but I think he could be disappointed.Saturday, 1 December, 2:30pm, Millennium Stadium. Live on BBC OneWales: Leigh Halfpenny; Alex Cuthbert, Jonathan Davies, Jamie Roberts, Liam Williams; Rhys Priestland, Mike Phillips; Gethin Jenkins, Matthew Rees, Scott Andrews, Ian Evans, Luke Charteris, Aaron Shingler, Sam Warburton (capt), Toby Faletau.Replacements: Ken Owens, Ryan Bevington, Samson Lee, Ryan Jones, Justin Tipuric, Tavis Knoyle, Dan Biggar, Scott WilliamsAustralia: Berrick Barnes, Nick Cummins, Adam Ashley-Cooper, Ben Tapuai, Drew Mitchell, Kurtley Beale, Nick Phipps, Wycliff Palu, David Pocock, Scott Higginbotham, Nathan Sharpe (captain), Kane Douglas, Ben Alexander, Tatafu Polota Nau, Benn RobinsonReplacements: Stephen Moore, James Slipper, Sekope Kepu, Dave Dennis, Michael Hooper, Brendan McKibbin, Mike Harris, Digby Ioane MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA – JUNE 16: Mike Phillips of Wales passes the ball during the International Test Match between the Australian Wallabies and Wales at Etihad Stadium on June 16, 2012 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Scott Barbour/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Catch me if you can: Berrick Barnes gives Sam Warburton the runaround in the summer Tests, will it happen again?By Owain Jones, Rugby World editorWales v Australia: The previewAUSTRALIA COACH Robbie Deans will be asking for more of the same against a Welsh side they have defeated five times in the last 13 months. However for those thinking it will be a walkover, a note of caution. In those five games, the losing margin was just 20 points, at an average of four points a game. In other words, very fine margins and the Aussies know it.Wales go into the fixture in wretched form, with six losses on the bounce, but Australia have had a topsy-turvy year. One week they are smashed 33-6 by France and the next the defeat England with a spirited 20-14 win at Twickenham. You could argue that Wales have the slightly stronger motivation. They have to avoid the nightmare scenario of dropping down into the third tier of seeds for the Rugby World Cup draw on Monday. Only a month ago, Wales were less than a point from a top four position and talking up the possibility of sneaking into the top tier. For Lions coach Warren Gatland, now back at the helm with Wales, it will be particularly intriguing, as the Lions tour of Australia draws closer.Battle of the opensidesThe openside battle will be box-office, with the Lions tour just six months away. There are four world-class No 7s in the matchday 23. First up on the scorecard will be David Pocock and Sam Warburton who will be going to head to head at the breakdown. Pocock is just back from a knee injury that has kept him out for a few months so you’d expect Warburton to be more battle hardened, on the flipside, many will say Pocock is fresher. The Welsh openside showed last weekend against the All Blacks that he is getting back to his old self, putting in several big hits and crucial turnovers. You’d imagine both coaches would want to give their deputy No 7s a run, so expect Justin Tipuric and Michael Hooperto enter the fray in the second-half. Hooper has showed his massive potential as Pocock’s mini-me during his absence and Tipuric has been pushing Warburton exceptionally hard with his brilliant play in the loose for the Ospreys. Most other international sides will cast envious glances at the embarrassment of riches in both camps.Key man: Pocock is vital to the WallabiesBacks to the wall Wales’ backline have struggled to unpick defences in the Autumn Series with only three tries, one of which came from an interception from Ashley Beck and another from an audacious 13-man line-out in which Scott Williams crashed over against New Zealand. Wales have named six of the backs they fielded during the Grand Slam campaign, with only George North missing and will hope much-missed Jonathan Davies can continue his intelligent running lines to feed the likes of Leigh Halfpenny and rapidly maturing Alex Cuthbert. They will also be hoping for a return to form of Rhys Priestland who has been suffering from a loss of confidence. The Wallabies have lots of new names in their backline and Nick Cummins will surely looking for some another ‘piece of Test meat’ against England one of the autumn’s better performers. How the dual-playmakers Berrick Barnes and Kurtley Beale experiment continues to flourish will also go some way to deciding the fate of this Test.Delivery: Phillips will hope to spark WalesWalking woundedlast_img read more

Scotland name squad for November Tests

first_imgForwards: John Barclay (Scarlets), John Beattie (Montpellier), Kelly Brown (Saracens), Blair Cowan (London Irish), Geoff Cross (Edinburgh), David Denton (Edinburgh), Alasdair Dickinson (Edinburgh), Ross Ford (Edinburgh), Chris Fusaro (Glasgow Warriors), Grant Gilchrist (Edinburgh), Ryan Grant (Glasgow Warriors), Jonny Gray (Glasgow Warriors), Richie Gray (Castres), Jim Hamilton (Montpellier), Rob Harley (Glasgow Warriors), Alastair Kellock (Glasgow Warriors), Scott Lawson (Newcastle Falcons), Kieran Low (London Irish), Moray Low (Glasgow Warriors), Pat MacArthur (Glasgow Warriors), Euan Murray (Worcester Warriors), Alasdair Strokosch (Perpignan), Tim Swinson (Glasgow Warriors), Jon Welsh (Glasgow Warriors) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Scotland training squad for autumn Tests:Backs: Mark Bennett (Glasgow Warriors), Chris Cusiter (Glasgow Warriors), Nick De Luca (Edinburgh), Alex Dunbar (Glasgow Warriors), Max Evans (Castres), Tom Heathcote (Bath), Ruaridh Jackson (Glasgow Warriors), Sean Lamont (Glasgow Warriors), Greig Laidlaw (Edinburgh), Sean Maitland (Glasgow Warriors), Henry Pyrgos (Glasgow Warriors), Matt Scott (Edinburgh), Tommy Seymour (Glasgow Warriors), Duncan Taylor (Saracens), Greig Tonks (Edinburgh), Tim Visser (Edinburgh), Duncan Weir (Glasgow Warriors)center_img Breakthrough: Mark Bennett has played well enough for Glasgow Warriors to earn selection for Scotland’s 41SCOTLAND HAVE named five uncapped players in their greater training squad of 41 for the November Tests.Mark Bennett, Jonny Gray and Chris Fusaro have been rewarded for Glasgow Warriors’ fine form sees them earn a call-up for next week’s training camp ahead of the three Tests against Japan, South Africa and Australia while London Irish back-row pair Kieran Low and Blair Cowan are also called up thanks to Scottish ancestry.Furthermore, Edinburgh pair Stuart McInally and Ross Rennie have been invited to train but as McInally is still learning to hook after moving forward from the back-row in the off-season and with Rennie still trying to shake an injury neither should feature in the Tests.Talking of his selections for the upcoming Tests: “This squad is about getting the job right for our upcoming Test matches but it’s also about the next 24 months as we build towards Rugby World Cup 2015.“We have to make sure, too, that our young players, who have the ability to play international footy, get the mileage on the clock ahead of the World Cup.”last_img read more

Six Nations: Players to watch for the 2017 Championship

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Power-packed: Ellis Genge is a force in the loose Each Six Nations Championship throws up a new wave of superstars in front of bumper TV audiences, so who is set to soar in the year’s tournament? Added muscle: Cornell du Preez will add firepower to the Scotland packWith the Six Nations adopting the aforementioned bonus points, du Preez’s proclivity to cross the whitewash and create opportunities for the players around him make him a valuable asset going into the championship. The Port Elizabeth-born forward is a menace as a ball-carrier, not only for the power and intelligence of his running lines, but also the fact he keeps the ball high and in two hands, making him a nightmare to defend.Mohamed Boughanmi, FranceCan this tighthead break the stranglehold Rabah Slimani and Uini Atonio currently have on the French three jersey?His departure from Toulon in the summer has seen him move from a bit-part player on the Côte d’Azur to a spearhead in the Bay of Biscay, as he has helped lead Stade Rochelais’ rise up the Top 14 table. With the unfancied club from the west going head-to-head with Clermont at the top of the table, Boughanmi is enjoying some well-earned time in the spotlight.Unit: La Rochelle’s French prop Mohamed Boughanmi has impressedThere is no doubt that he has significant competition in the forms of Atonio and Slimani but with the French scrum far from the dominant, all-conquering proposition it once was, fresh blood up front could be just what Novès needs to ignite the new-look Les Bleus.Ellis Genge, EnglandGenge has already made his England bow – he was a replacement in England’s pre-summer tour meeting with Wales at Twickenham – but no longer is he just a young player included to gain experience and learn about the Test match environment, he is now a bona fide contender to be England’s starting loosehead.Leicester’s form has been erratic to say the least this season but even at the club’s lowest ebb – a 38-0 humbling to Munster at Thomond Park – Genge has proven able to more than hold his own against his opposite number. The 21-year-old’s set-piece skills far bely his tender age, whilst his ability with ball in hand, both as a carrier and distributor on the gain line, makes him the perfect front row forward to help inject tempo into a game.Making an impression: Ellis Genge is a huge asset in the looseJones will be hoping that experienced loosehead Joe Marler is available when the tournament kicks off in two weeks’ time but if not, Genge is more than ready to step in and fill the void. If Marler is ready, Genge can provide valuable impact off the bench.Niall Scannell, IrelandAs Ireland have yet to name their Six Nations squad, this is a speculative suggestion.center_img With Sean Cronin injured, the hierarchy behind Rory Best at hooker is blurred and this uncapped front-rower has been in sparkling form for Munster in both the Guinness PRO12 and Champions Cup. A consistent thrower, strong scrummager and athletic enough to be a significant influence in loose play, Scannell would seem to be next man up for Ireland at hooker.Making his bow: Niall Scannell has been rewarded after some fine performancesBetween Jack McGrath and Tadgh Furlong, not to mention a resurgent Best, Ireland’s front row has been setting new standards in the northern hemisphere this season and Scannell is a player who will only add impetus to that if selected when Schmidt announces his squad on Sunday. By Alex ShawThe Six Nations squads are all in.Conor O’Shea got the ball rolling last week, naming an experienced Italian squad for his debut campaign, followed by Rob Howley’s announcement of a Wales squad offering plenty of tried and tested players, but also seven new caps.Scotland, coming off the back of an impressive autumn, include just two uncapped players in their contingent, whilst France have opted for a middle ground, bringing in four uncapped players, in an attempt to freshen a group that has yet to kick on under Guy Novès.As for England and Ireland – the two tournament favourites – Eddie Jones has largely stuck with the squad that won him 13 consecutive games last year and Joe Schmidt named his squad early on Monday, and as expected, it has not moved to far away from the  core of players who recorded historic victories over New Zealand and South Africa last year.We take a look at some of the new additions to these squads that have the capability to have profound effects on their respective nation’s prospects over the next two months.Thomas Young, WalesThomas Young is a player whose name has never been far from Welsh lips over the last few months.With James Haskell and Sam Jones injured at Wasps, Young has made the most of the playing time that has come his way and has helped deliver the club’s effective, high-tempo playing style in both the Aviva Premiership and European Rugby Champions Cup. He has performed equally as a contact area specialist and a link-man with ball in hand and though prospering in these traditional areas of an openside flanker, he has also displayed all of the physical skills and robustness required to operate in the Test match arena.Man in form: Thomas Young has been tearing it up for WaspsThe captaincy switch to Alun Wyn Jones could open up a starting spot at seven for Young or he could be tasked with making an impact from the bench, but either way he needs to see action for Wales over the next two months. He would play a key role in injecting much-needed tempo into the side, a need that will only be made more urgent if the introduction of bonus points this year does indeed bring about a more attacking mindset among the teams.Cornell du Preez, ScotlandAfter qualifying on residency, du Preez was called-up by Scotland during the autumn internationals but just missed out on winning his first cap. That looks likely to change during the Six Nations.The versatile South African can pack down anywhere in the back row and should be in the competition for at least the six and eight jerseys, if not also at seven. He is a consistent performer in an inconsistent Edinburgh side and if he takes to Test match rugby and delivers just as much for Scotland as he does at club level, then he will be another player that the Springboks will come to rue losing.last_img read more

Rugby’s Greatest: Kieran Read

first_img All Black Sean Fitzpatrick epitomised the rugged hardness… Rugby’s Greatest: Richie McCaw Major teams: Canterbury, CrusadersCountry: New Zealand
Test span: 2008-New Zealand caps: 122 Winners of the past two World Cups, the… LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS That Scottish assignment came wearing six too, but by the end of 2009 he was entrenched as Graham Henry’s first-choice No 8. Accolades continued with a late try to clinch a 23-22 victory over Australia the next season, sealing the Tri-Nations title and a New Zealand Player of the Year gong.Global glory at the 2011 World Cup foreshadowed a phenomenal 2013. In June of that year, captaining his country in the absence of Richie McCaw, Read oversaw a 30-0 defeat of France in what was his 50th and New Zealand’s 500th Test. The year would end with 14 consecutive wins for the All Blacks. Their talisman featured in 13, contributing six tries. He was runaway IRB Player of the Year. He was also fundamental to the All Blacks’ successive World Cup triumph in 2015.As for the respect of fellow greats, Lawrence Dallaglio once heralded him “better than Buck Shelford and Zinzan Brooke”. There is no higher praise. New Zealand Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Rugby’s Greatest: Sean Fitzpatrick TAGS: The Greatest Players All Black Richie McCaw is the greatest openside…center_img Kieran Read of New Zealand Expand New Zealand Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Rugby’s Greatest: Kieran ReadDeath, taxes and Kieran Read unpicking defences in the 15-metre channel – these are three inevitabilities in this world.Athleticism and on-field intelligence brought Read an All Blacks debut at Murrayfield in 2008, two months after his 23rd birthday. Only two years previously, he had made a provincial bow for Canterbury.Growing up on New Zealand’s North Island before pursuing rugby opportunities across the Cook Strait, Read starred for Karaka Cricket Club close to Auckland. By 16, he was an age-group international batsman.The oval ball won out though, and he became a regular in the Crusaders Super Rugby outfit. Starting the victorious 2008 decider against the Waratahs at blindside flanker, Read won a place on the end-of-season tour and has not looked back. Rugby’s Greatest: Sean Fitzpatrick Rugby’s Greatest: Richie McCaw Follow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features.Also make sure you know about the Groups, Warm-ups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Collapse Expandlast_img read more

Male focus important at UN Commission on Women, says England…

first_img Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Comments are closed. Submit a Press Release Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI [Church of England] Mandy Marshall, the Church of England representative at this year’s U.N. Commission on the Status of Women (UNCSW), says that educating men and boys is key to preventing violence against women, adding that faith groups must lead the way.The commission, which runs from March 4-15, is designed to coincide with International Women’s Day on March 8.Writing in her blog on “Men at a Women’s conference,” Marshall referred to a presentation from the Sonke Gender Justice Network in South Africa outlining 10 points required in engaging men to prevent and end violence against women.But she stressed that there must be “a focus on including faith leaders, as transformers of cultures, in the process of prevention.”Mandy who is using social media to keep supporters updated during the commission concluded her latest blog with: “With one in four women in the U.K. suffering abuse in her lifetime, and two women a week being killed by their partner or former partner, it is indeed time for action.” Featured Jobs & Calls Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Comments (1) Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS March 7, 2013 at 6:02 pm Finally someone understands. Your churches are filled with women. Your problem is attracting men. You better figure out how to do that. We are losing the next generation – and the way to stop that is to stop your hatred of men. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Collierville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Posted Mar 7, 2013 Submit a Job Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Belleville, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Tampa, FL Rector Bath, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Anglican Communion, Tags Featured Events Male focus important at UN Commission on Women, says England rep International Women’s Day 2013 celebrated March 8 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Press Release Service Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Women’s Ministry Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Course Director Jerusalem, Israel tom blair says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab last_img read more

Maryland parish pre-school teacher gravely wounded in bombing

first_imgMaryland parish pre-school teacher gravely wounded in bombing Sister also wounded as the pair cheered their mother’s marathon run Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector Columbus, GA Boston Marathon Bombing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit an Event Listing Rector Tampa, FL Kathleen Dubois says: Comments (3) Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis April 18, 2013 at 8:36 pm Please help support her. Liz Harlan, her former and future employer has set up a trust fund. Donate at http://www.thebrannockfund.com Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Press Release Service An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Events Rector Bath, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Erika Brannock, 29, who teaches preschoolers at Trinity Episcopal Children’s Center in Towson, Maryland, is recovering after losing part of her left leg because of injuries she suffered in the Boston Marathon bombings. Photo/Russell Street Report[Episcopal News Service] Erika Brannock, 29, who teaches preschoolers at Trinity Episcopal Children’s Center in Towson, Maryland, has lost part of her left leg after being injured in the Boston Marathon bombings.Brannock and her sister, Nicole Gross, 31, a personal trainer at Charlotte Athletic Club in North Carolina, were at the finish line to meet their mother, Carol Downing, as she completed her third marathon. Gross had reportedly helped Downing train for the race.The blast broke both of Nicole Gross’s legs and she also suffered a severed Achilles tendon, according to media reports.Brannock, Gross and Gross’ husband, Brian, were outside the LensCrafters on Boylston Street, one of the bloodiest sites along the course, according to the Baltimore Sun newspaper.Runners continue towards the finish line of the Boston Marathon April 12 as an explosion erupts near the finish line of the race in this photo exclusively licensed to Reuters by photographer Dan Lampariello. Two simultaneous explosions ripped through the crowd at the race’s finish line, killing at least two people and injuring dozens on a day when tens of thousands of people pack the streets to watch the world-famous race. REUTERS/Dan LamparielloDowning, of Monkton, Maryland, was running a half mile from the finish line and was not injured. The Sun reported that it took her six hours to find her daughters.Brannock was raced to Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, where doctors amputated her left leg below the knee, Brian Gross told the Boston Globe newspaper. Doctors are also “keeping an eye on the other leg and are concerned with her foot,” Gross said.Photos of Nicole Gross taken moments after the blast appeared in several newspapers and online. The family issued a statement April 17 asking the media to stop using the images, saying they are “tremendously painful” for the family, according to WUSA television station.Trinity Episcopal Church will hold a prayer service at 7 p.m. April 17 “for healing and restoration in continuing support of all those affected the violence in Boston, especially Erika Brannock and her family,” according to the church’s website. Episcopalians from nearby Church of the Good Shepherd in Ruxton and Holy Comforter in Lutherville will be part of the gathering.During football season, Brannock dons Baltimore Ravens gear for Purple Fridays, a schoolwide celebration of the team.Jonathan Ralton, left, of Boston, and runner Kelly Daughtery, of Portland, Oregon, third from right, pray during a Eucharist and Vigil for a Day of Violence at the Episcopal Cathedral Church of St. Paul near Boston Common on April 16. Ralton was volunteering at the Boston Marathon a little over a block away from the blast. AP Photo/The Christian Science Monitor, Ann Hermes“She is such a Ravens fan, we’re going to have an honorary Purple Friday and photograph it and send it to her and her family,” the Rev. Kenneth H. Saunders III, Trinity’s rector, told the Globe. “The children have rallied around at school. We’re just praying for her and that she comes back to us soon.”The Los Angeles Times reported that family and friends were setting up a fund to help pay for her medical care, educational and living expenses after her return home.Brannock was one year from finishing her master’s degree in early childhood education, said Liz Harlan, the former director of the Trinity Episcopal Children’s Center, according to the Times. She told the Times that she hired Brannock to work at a new preschool after observing her skills in the classroom—where she said Brannock instinctively knew when a child needed to nestle into her lap or take a walk down the hall to avoid a meltdown.The National Association of Episcopal Schools called for prayers for Brannock and her family. The NAES has also posted resources to help schools help their students in the wake of the bombings.Brannock’s cousin Jocelyn Wood-Garrish told the Sun that the teacher was “aware and taking the news [about her injuries] very well,” adding that there were more surgeries to come. Brannock was communicating with the family by writing, and had requested pictures of the students she teaches. “I’m in awe of my cousin’s bravery,” Wood-Garrish said.The Los Angeles Times reported that Downing said on her Facebook page that Brannock had undergone two surgeries and had many more to go.A Boston couple took the “panicked, scared and cold” Downing back to their home, according to the Sun, where they gave her something to eat and drink, and had her take a shower. They also gave her a fleece jacket, which she kept, and stayed with her at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, where Gross had been taken, until family arrived.“With all the chaos and to be in a city where I don’t know anyone, it reminds me that there are some good people in the world,” Downing told the newspaper. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Comments are closed.center_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Press Release Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET By ENS StaffPosted Apr 17, 2013 Christopher Wu says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Tags Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Shreveport, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Hopkinsville, KY April 18, 2013 at 3:01 pm Continued prayers go out to all who were touched by the events in Boston. Rector Collierville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Rev Sandra Moyle says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA April 18, 2013 at 9:17 am I am awed by the gifts of the Divine Healer given in the midst of this tragedy: the resiliency of this family and the skill of surgeons and doctors and the hospitality of strangers. Please post more news on the fund being set up. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate Diocese of Nebraska last_img read more

Minnesota bishop sets process for same-sex marriage

first_img May 15, 2013 at 5:48 pm Perhaps you missed these paragraphs:And, Prior told Episcopal News Service, the diocese’s stance means that those congregations that choose not to marry same-sex couples also cannot become marginalized. If they choose to exercise the exemption in the law, he said, “that’s fine and we can clearly support” their decision.While Prior said he has not had a large number of requests for him to approve same-sex blessings, he knows that there are a “significant number” of people whom clergy report are waiting for the law to go into effect so that they can marry.In his letter to clergy, Prior said those who solemnize the marriage of same-sex couples must use the liturgy found in Liturgical Resources 1: I Will Bless You and You Will be a Blessing. This is the provisional rite for same-sex blessings approved in July 2012 by the church’s General Convention.Prior said in his interview with ENS that he made this decision, in part, because of the argument the marriage rites in The Book of Common Prayer were canonically intended for heterosexual couples.The convention specifically did not authorize a same-sex marriage rite and use of the provision liturgy will be reviewed by the 2015 convention. At the behest of convention, a task force has begun to “identify and explore biblical, theological, historical, liturgical, and canonical dimensions of marriage.” It will also, among other things, consider the church’s response to the changing legal context in which a growing number of dioceses are operating. Rector Martinsville, VA Paul Rider says: Same-Sex Marriage Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Reverend Susan Russell says: Zachary Brooks says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books May 15, 2013 at 6:56 pm In point of fact, the current canons on marriage are inherently self-contradictory now that over 25% of Episcopalians live in states with civil marriage equaliy. Let’s review. The canons begin with:CANON 18: Of the Solemnization of Holy MatrimonySec. 1. Every Member of the Clergy of this Church shall conform to the laws of the State governing the creation of the civil status of marriage, and also to the laws of this Church governing the solemnization of Holy Matrimony.… and then continue with a “check list” — which includes in (b) a description of marriage.Sec. 2. Before solemnizing a marriage the Member of the Clergyshall have ascertained:(a) That both parties have the right to contract a marriageaccording to the laws of the State.(b) That both parties understand that Holy Matrimony is a physical and spiritual union of a man and a woman, entered into within the community of faith, by mutual consent of heart, mind, and will, and with intent that it be lifelong.(c) That both parties freely and knowingly consent to suchmarriage, without fraud, coercion, mistake as to identity of apartner, or mental reservation.(d) That at least one of the parties has received Holy Baptism.(e) That both parties have been instructed as to the nature,meaning, and purpose of Holy Matrimony by the Member ofthe Clergy, or that they have both received such instructionfrom persons known by the Member of the Clergy to becompetent and responsible.It can be argued … and indeed, is being argued … that Canon 18.2b does not proscribe that marriage is exclusively between a man and a woman … rather it describes Holy Matrimony as “a physical and spiritual union of a man and a woman, entered into within the community of faith, by mutual consent of heart, mind, and will, and with intent that it be lifelong” at a time when that was indeed the case. And it can be argued … and indeed, is being argued … that the values the make up the marriage transcend the gender of the couple committing to live out those values until death do they part.It can be argued … and indeed, is being argued … that the descriptive nature of the language in Canon 18.2b does not “trump” the instructive nature of Section 18.1 to “conform to the laws of the State governing the civil status of marriage” — and that bishops are operating within the spirit of the law (canon) when they authorize the clergy in their dioceses to stand on right side of history by offering equal blessing and equal protection to the same-sex couples coming to them for the blessing and solemnization of their civil marriage.All of this suffice to say there is plenty of work for the Task Force on the Study of Marriage to do … even as there are plenty of “happily ever afters” about to be celebrated in Minnesota, Delaware, Rhode Island, etc. etc. etc. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab May 15, 2013 at 7:47 pm I’m curious where the commentor got the impression there was any expressed intention to “stop at a blessing of same-gender unions.” Seriously. Advocates for the full inclusion of all the baptized in all the sacraments have been making the case — and not quietly, I believe it can fairly be said — that full inclusion means full inclusion. Since at the very least 2002 when the Claiming the Blessing Theology Statement was written. The liturgical resources adopted in Indianapolis in 2012 are certainly an important step toward that goal … but the journey continues. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET May 16, 2013 at 1:52 pm Reverend Russell’s assertion that the Church must have “all the baptized in all the sacraments” leads to the question as to when LGBTQ communicants are denied Holy Baptism or Eucharist. Our catechism calls these the two Sacraments of the Gospel and they are not withheld. If she is referring to the other sacramental rites (marriage, confirmation, ordination, reconciliation, and unction) the Catechism approved by this Church is clear:“Q: How do they differ from the two sacraments of the Gospel? A: Although they are means of grace, they are not necessary for all persons in the same way that Baptism and the Eucharist are.” Are children allowed ordination? Do baptized adults receive confirmation as well as baptism? Since they do not can this be interpreted as withholding grace and proper recognition of their spiritual journey? Not at all. Likewise, the insinuation of unfairness and fellings of injustice cannot be used as a reason to change the nature of marriage. Ultimately one must be willing to trample the plain word of Scripture to change marriage. In Matthew 19 (Jesus quotes Genesis 2): “Haven’t you read,” he replied, “that at the beginning the Creator ‘made them male and female,’ and said, ‘For this reason a man will leave his father and mother and be united to his wife, and the two will become one flesh’?”So, the attempt to change marriage cannot be supported by catholic Christianity nor the plain words of Christ. The only leg of Scripture – Tradition – and Reason left is “Reason”. In the argument for changing marriage one can make anything seem reasonable to themselves. I, however, am not willing to stand before Christ and tell Him that His plain word on the matter isn’t good enough. James Mikolajczyk says: May 26, 2013 at 1:56 pm Those of us who deal with regulations, laws, or canons all the time know that such things change according to context or paradigm shifts. For example, the U.S. Army dropped all of its Cold War doctrines and picked up General Petraeus’ COIN (i.e., counterinsurgency) precepts in their place after 9/11. A similar thing is happening in TEC because of its desire to offer a pastoral response to gays instead of degradation. Regardless of how we view homosexuality, all Christians should agree that gays should be treated with dignity and respect. Yet, that is certainly not what all Christians say. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Human Sexuality, Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Minnesota bishop sets process for same-sex marriage Response comes on day governor signs new law June 30, 2013 at 12:28 am In Ms. YRussell’s comment above … “proscribe” would perhaps better be “prescribe”? Pete Haynsworth says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Reverend Susan Russell says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Job Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ May 15, 2013 at 1:49 pm If you had read the whole article before casting judgment, you would have seen that the bishop makes it very clear he is talking about the blessing rite approved by General Convention. The fact that his diocese, and indeed the entire Episcopal Church, is bending over backwards to ensure that conservatives don’t have to perform same-sex blessings is the tell to schismatic claims of canonical persecution. Submit an Event Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Tags Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Press Release Comments are closed. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 May 15, 2013 at 12:49 pm When did General Convention approve a change in canons regarding marriage? I don’t recall General Convention changing the canons to say that individual bishops can redefine marriage. This is all proof-positive that a Trojan Horse was voted in at the last Convention. There was never an intention to stop at a blessing of same-gender unions. Now the question is, does this violation of canons get the same dedicated Title IV consequences as is being used against conservatives who are accused of violating property canons? Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Bath, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Washington, DC Doug Desper says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH May 31, 2013 at 9:15 pm James –I do not believe Jesus’s words in Matthew 19, where He quotes Genesis 2, are anything less than divine truth reiterated across generations. To believe that because “we” now exist on earth that all things can be relative to our paradigm or context is arrogance. Rector Knoxville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Doug Desper says: Comments (9) Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Albany, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Events Rector Tampa, FL By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted May 15, 2013 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Collierville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA [Episcopal News Service] Some Episcopal Church congregations in the Diocese of Minnesota will decide to marry same-sex couples when a new state law goes into effect in August and some will not, and Bishop Brian Prior says that difference “represents the diversity and the comprehensive nature of who we are as Episcopalians and Anglicans.”Writing on his blog May 14, a few hours before Gov. Mark Dayton signed the bills recently passed by the state legislature, Prior said that “for a number of our faith communities, this will now provide them the opportunity to provide to all of their members who desire to make a life-long, covenant relationship and to be legally married in the state of Minnesota to do so.”“Other of our faith communities may not find this calling among their membership, within their context, or in culture – and will not be providing such services,” he added.The new law includes legal protections for religious groups that do not want to marry same-sex couples.Prior also sent a letter to diocesan clergy outlining a process for those congregations which decide to marry same-sex couples. He noted that those expectations are similar to the ones for clergy wishing to bless same-sex relationships that were in place when he became bishop in February 2010.“From its very origins, the Episcopal Church in Minnesota has always stood with the marginalized,” the bishop said in a statement included in a press kit sent to leaders of diocesan congregations for their use if they choose to speak to the media about the new law and the church’s response.“Race, ethnicity, gender, gender orientation or immigrant; we have embraced both the Gospel mandate of love of neighbor and the Baptismal Covenant imperative to respect the dignity of every human being. Any actions, whether sacred or secular, that prevent our LGBT brothers and sisters from exercising the rights and privileges that the rest of Minnesotans enjoy – are considered to be marginalizing and contrary to the Gospel, the Baptismal Covenant and our history.”And, Prior told Episcopal News Service, the diocese’s stance means that those congregations that choose not to marry same-sex couples also cannot become marginalized. If they choose to exercise the exemption in the law, he said, “that’s fine and we can clearly support” their decision.While Prior said he has not had a large number of requests for him to approve same-sex blessings, he knows that there are a “significant number” of people whom clergy report are waiting for the law to go into effect so that they can marry.In his letter to clergy, Prior said those who solemnize the marriage of same-sex couples must use the liturgy found in Liturgical Resources 1: I Will Bless You and You Will be a Blessing. This is the provisional rite for same-sex blessings approved in July 2012 by the church’s General Convention.Prior said in his interview with ENS that he made this decision, in part, because of the argument the marriage rites in The Book of Common Prayer were canonically intended for heterosexual couples.The convention specifically did not authorize a same-sex marriage rite and use of the provision liturgy will be reviewed by the 2015 convention. At the behest of convention, a task force has begun to “identify and explore biblical, theological, historical, liturgical, and canonical dimensions of marriage.” It will also, among other things, consider the church’s response to the changing legal context in which a growing number of dioceses are operating.Minnesota is the first Midwestern state to change its marriage laws to allow same-sex couples to wed without a court ordering it to do so. The Iowa Supreme Court in 2009 ruled that that state had to allow same-sex marriage.Last year Minnesota voters rejected a state constitutional amendment that would have banned same-sex marriage.The state Senate passed the bill May 13 by a 37 to 30 margin, after the state House had approved its version on May 10.Minnesota’s decision came days after Rhode Island and Delaware became the 10th and 11th states, respectively, to allow same-sex marriage. The bishops in the dioceses that encompass each state supported the enactment of the laws and said that their dioceses would respond in ways consistent with that support.Same-sex marriage also is allowed in Connecticut, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Vermont, Washington and the District of Columbia. Voters in Maine, Maryland and Washington last fall supported changes to their state’s marriage laws. Thirty-three states prohibit same-sex marriage.On May 10, Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn called on that state’s House to approve a bill allowing same-sex marriage that the Senate passed on Valentine’s Day. Quinn said he would sign the bill into law.In March, the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments in two same-sex marriage cases. One challenges Proposition 8, the California referendum that revoked same-sex marriage rights in that state. The other challenges the constitutionality of Section 3 of the federal Defense of Marriage Act, which defines marriage as between one man and one woman. The court has not yet issued its opinion in either case.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Doug Desper says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Belleville, IL last_img read more

La Diócesis de Puerto Rico anuncia 4 nominados a la…

first_img Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Latin America, Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Comments (1) Ed Vargas says: Province IX The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Comments are closed. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit an Event Listing Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Posted Oct 21, 2016 Rector Knoxville, TN Press Release Service TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Events Tags Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Tampa, FL Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA A todo el Clero y Laicos de la Iglesia Episcopal Puertorriqueña Gracias y paz en nombre de nuestro Señor y Salvador Jesucristo. El Comité de Búsqueda y Nominaciones del proceso para la elección de un Obispo/a para la Diócesis Episcopal de Puerto Rico luego de profunda oración y discernimiento en el ejercicio de su responsabilidad y de acuerdo a los criterios establecidos por el Comité Permanente, hizo entrega el martes 27 de septiembre de 2016 de la papeleta en la cual nos presentan a los siguientes candidatos: ‘1. Rvda. Pbra. Carla Roland Guzman – Diocesis de New York2. Rvdo. P. César Ramirez Segarra – Diocesis de Puerto Rico3. Rvdo. P. Rafael Morales Maldonado – Diocesis de Puerto Rico4. Rvdo. P. Luis Fernando Padilla Morales – Diocesis de Puerto RicoDe acuerdo al cronograma el proceso de nominación directa o por petición comienza el 1ro de octubre y finaliza el 10 de octubre de 2016. Los criterios y requisitos para este proceso están publicados en la página web www.episcopalpr.org en pestaña de Recursos y el enlace Proceso de Elección Obispo/a Diocesano/a.Continuemos orando ya que este proceso no termina hoy. La Asamblea de Elección será el sábado 10 de diciembre de 2016 en el Club de Leones de Bayamón. La convocatoria oficial y las reglas para el proceso de elección serán publicadas prontamente.Que el Espíritu Santo derrame su bendición sobre la Iglesia Episcopal Puertorriqueña para que completemos este proceso y escojamos la persona idónea para que sea nuestro próximo pastor.En CristoFrancisco Quinones González Presidente Comité Permanente 2016 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Bishop Elections, Director of Music Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Collierville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Shreveport, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME La Diócesis de Puerto Rico anuncia 4 nominados a la elección de Obispo December 3, 2016 at 2:47 pm The rightful thing for this diocese is to elect one of our own people to lead. A priest that know his people and understands their needs. Not someone that has been out of contact. Rector Bath, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Youth Minister Lorton, VAlast_img read more

Trump signs Dakota Access Pipeline memo to speed process

first_imgTrump signs Dakota Access Pipeline memo to speed process President also wants to ‘build our own pipelines with our own pipes’ mike geibel says: By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jan 24, 2017 At the White House Jan. 24, U.S. President Donald Trump holds up a presidential memorandum he had just signed related to the Dakota Access pipeline. Photo: REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque[Episcopal News Service] While reaction to President Donald Trump’s Jan. 24 actions designed to move forward both the Keystone XL and Dakota Access pipelines was swift, the immediate impact of his memoranda remained unclear.Nothing in Trump’s memorandum on the Dakota Access Pipeline appears to force approval of the project but it calls on officals to speed up the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ ongoing environmental review process.A presidential memorandum is somewhat different from a presidential executive order and some observers say it has a lesser impact.Other observers wondered if Trump’s decision to sign the documents fit what they see as a pattern of Trump and his aides seeking to distract the media from other events happening as the administration gears up, including nomination hearings, ethics inquiries and changes to websites and policies that restrict communication with the public and prevent public input. Also published on Jan. 24 was a proclamation that Trump signed soon after becoming president Jan. 20, declaring that day to be a “National Day of Patriotic Devotion.”In the Dakota Access Pipeline memo Trump tells the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to “review and approve in an expedited manner, to the extent permitted by law and as warranted, and with such conditions as are necessary or appropriate” the company’s request to finish the pipeline. The remaining work would push the pipeline under Lake Oahe on the Missouri River just north of the Standing Rock Sioux Nation reservation. The proposed crossing is upstream from the tribe’s reservation boundaries, and the tribe has water, treaty fishing and hunting rights in the lake.The Corps decided Dec. 4 to put that work on hold, cheering opponents, and conduct the environmental impact statement, including exploring alternative routes.At the time, Presiding Bishop Michael Curry asked that “the assessment involve extensive consultation with affected populations, and that any plan going forward honor treaty obligations with the Standing Rock Sioux.”The Episcopal Church has been advocating with the Sioux Nation about the pipeline since summer 2016. Local Episcopalians have also provided a ministry of presence in and around Cannon Ball, North Dakota, which has been the focal point for the groups of water protectors that gathered near the proposed crossing.However, Trump’s order says the Army shall “consider, to the extent permitted by law and as warranted, whether to rescind or modify” its Dec. 4 decision, revert to the Corps July 2016 environmental assessment and grant the required easement for the lake crossing.The Standing Rock Sioux Nation said that Trump’s actions Jan. 24 violate the law and tribal treaties. Saying it will take legal action against Trump’s efforts, the tribe added, “Nothing will deter us from our fight for clean water.”The tribe urged its supporters “to fight and stand tall beside us,” and to contact their representatives in Congress to “let them know that the people do not stand behind today’s decision.”Dave Archambault II, chairman of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, said Trump “is legally required to honor our treaty rights and provide a fair and reasonable pipeline process.”The tribe’s statement noted that on Jan. 18 the Corps opened the public comment phase of its environmental impact analysis of the company’s request. Public comment is due by Feb. 17.The Sioux Nation said last week that it welcomed the Corps’ work but said “it should include at the very least the territory of the entire Great Sioux Nation, and not just Lake Oahe and the northern boundary of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s Reservation.”Trump told reporters during a White House Oval Office signing ceremony that both pipelines will be subject to conditions being negotiated by U.S. officials – including a requirement that the pipe itself be manufactured in America. “I am very insistent that if we’re going to build pipelines in the United States, the pipes should be made in the United States,” he said, noting that his requirement will take time to fulfill because most steel piping used in the United States is made elsewhere.“From now on we are going to start making pipelines in the United States,” Trump said from the Oval Office. “We will build our own pipelines with our own pipes, that’s what it has to do with, like we used to in the old days,” he said, adding that the directive will put “lots of steelworkers” back to work.Trump did not comment on his directive about the Dakota Access Pipeline. Press Secretary Sean Spicer later told reporters that Trump “has shown through his business life that he knows how to negotiate a great deal where parties come out ahead.” Spicer said Trump is willing to sit down “with all of the individuals who are involved in the Dakota pipeline to make sure that it is a deal that benefits all of the parties of interest or at least gets something that they want.”Texts of the pipeline-related actions taken by Trump Jan. 24 are here and here.The 1,172-mile, 30-inch diameter pipeline is poised to carry up to 570,000 gallons of oil a day from the Bakken oil field in northwestern North Dakota – through South Dakota and Iowa – to Illinois where it will be shipped to refineries. The pipeline was to pass within one-half mile of the Standing Rock Reservation and Sioux tribal leaders repeatedly expressed concerns over the potential for an oil spill that would damage the reservation’s water supply, and the threat the pipeline posed to sacred sites and treaty rights. The company developing the pipeline, Texas-based Energy Transfer Partners, says it will be safe.Thousands of people, including Native Americans and indigenous people representing about 300 tribes from around the world, traveled to North Dakota in summer and fall of 2016 in an unprecedented show of solidarity with the Standing Rock Sioux Nation.The tribe recently told the people remaining in the protest camps to leave due to safety and environmental concerns over flooding as the massive snowpack in the area melts. The snowpack typically melts swiftly in the area, causing rapid flooding that could sweep people and material into the river. The tribal council was also concerned about continuing protests at the Backwater Bridge leading to and from the area. The tribe had requested an end to those protests but some people in the camps had ignored that request.Previous Episcopal News Service coverage is here.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. January 26, 2017 at 12:12 pm Are conservative commentators here implying that the Keystone XL Pipeline, the Dakota Access Pipeline and indigenous rights are left-right issues? It seems to me that these matters should transcend partisan politics. Being a Republican doesn’t mean that you want to wreck nature or run roughshod over indigenous peoples. Rector Knoxville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA January 27, 2017 at 2:53 pm I think we need to get some things straight about the Dakota Access Pipeline so we know what or if we even should protest.1. The pipeline does NOT cross any land owned by Standing Rock Sioux. It is ALL on private or federal land.2.The tribe WAS consulted dozens of times. The only thing they would accept is termination3.More than 50 other tribes DID participate in the process and we consulted4.Drinking water is NOT the problem. The drinking water intake was moved years ago 70 miles south of where the pipeline is going.5. The pipeline is to be installed 100 feet BELOW the riverbed.6. There are dozens of other pipelines of gas, oil, etc upstream already.7. The oil is ALREADY being shipped by train or trucks which have more potential to spill than the pipeline.This information came from and article in the WSJ 12/7/1016 by Kevin Cramer, North Dakota US Representative Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Collierville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Glenn Johnson says: January 24, 2017 at 7:24 pm it is almost unimaginable the amount of harm this prez will do…almost, except to those who know what depths evil can go to. One might hope that these guys will over reach, but that is problematic….the Beast is very hard to beat. Im sure there were those in Germany, back in the day, that thought ‘surely , it wont get as bad as can be’. Thanks to the majority of american christians, we are about to find out.jan 20th national patriotic devotion day…wow, how facist of you JF Shinn says: Michael J. Staley says: Donald Heacock says: Michael Patterson says: Rector Washington, DC Michael C. Brown says: Rector Martinsville, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID February 5, 2017 at 2:36 pm No Glenn, people are leaving the church not because we are not Christians it’s because of people like you. We are sick of your name calling and demonizing those of us that don’t see your point of view. There are many of us who have a problem with the depth that the Episcopal Church has emersed itself into politics. When we are gone only you will be left with those like you. Christianity is a religion of acceptance not exclusion. Take a look into yourself before criticizing others. Rector Albany, NY Tom Cottrell says: Indigenous Ministries, January 31, 2017 at 12:15 am They left the church because they are not Christians, never were, never paid heed to the words of Jesus. Political parities have nothing to do with it. The words of Jesus are what count. Kilty Maoris says: Michael J. Staley says: Rector Tampa, FL January 24, 2017 at 8:33 pm Working men & women are despised by the Democrat Party. I belonged but no more. . .I pray it won’t happen in my churxhh . Submit a Job Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT elena laporosa says: January 28, 2017 at 9:17 pm This is the time of “The Jesus Movement”. When was the last time you went to church?? Most folks I worship with are working folks, both blur and white collar. And we have social programs for the less advantaged. are Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK January 29, 2017 at 1:26 am I should clarify that my view of what is “right” and “left” in the current political spectrum do not necessarily correspond with Democratic and Republican Party platforms… Terry Francis says: January 25, 2017 at 9:42 pm Michael Staley, let me first say that I’m a conservative who did not vote for Trump. Having said that I find your judgmental attitude toward people like Stephen who choose not to get on board the leftward leaning dump Trump bandwagon disturbing. True TEC should not be a country club, but it also shouldn’t be just another wing of the DNC. Who are you to accuse people like Stephen of being less of a Christian because he chooses not to be involved in these activities. That’s about as arrogant and un-Christian as it gets! As for doing holy work, many people have different definitions as to what holy work consists of. To you it means resisting Trump policies by any means necessary. If a Christian who is pro life chooses to picket a Planned Parenthood facility or an abortion clinic would you consider that holy work? Of course not. Instead you would probably condemn it. As a Christian you need to stop looking down on people who don’t agree with your views Michael. Our Lord and Savior doesn’t love you one iota more than He does people like Stephen. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Kilty Maoris says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 January 25, 2017 at 10:43 am Thank you Stephen. My family’s thoughts exactly. Jeffrey Jones says: January 25, 2017 at 4:28 pm As Gay Jennings+ said in her remarks following the election of Mr. Trump, “resistance is holy work.” Indeed it is. There were folks, like you, hiding behind stained glass windows, to paraphrase Martin Luther King, Jr.’s words, who used similar rhetoric to claim that the church should stay out of the racial politics in the south in the 1960s. But that was (and remains) holy work. Similarly, DAPL has racial and environmental implications, and it’s high time we do God’s work,” and be good stewards of creation, and to stand up for the afflicted. And so, while you claim that many people are leaving the church because the church chooses to act, I will also add that I, as a young convert, wouldn’t be interested in a church that stood idly by. I converted to a church, not a country club. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Bill Louis says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY January 29, 2017 at 7:28 am Thanks Arden for information we will never see on the mainstream media. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Comments (23) Michael Patterson says: Tags January 26, 2017 at 7:37 pm Hi Terry,Let’s set the record straight: I didn’t say TEC should become another wing of the DNC, that Stephen has to make DAPL or Keystone XL (or the environment) as his own issues, or that Jesus loves me more than Stephen or anyone else because of the issues we take on individually or as a church. You said those things, not me. Further, I’m keenly aware that Christians embrace issues from different perspectives that often are in conflict. What I am saying is that the church has an obligation to be politically engaged. I don’t know what Stephen’s definition of “God’s work” is, but I do know that advocating for those whose rights are impinged upon, and for the right use of the environment is holy work. Yes, we must feed the hungry, but we also must work against a system that perpetuates hunger. I’m making an assumption here, and I hope not unfairly, but Stephen’s definition of God’s work seems to be focus on serving food and providing shelter, meanwhile staying out of politics. What I’m saying is that we must do both. February 5, 2017 at 3:14 pm Stephan-Any time we help others in our community, be it Indians in the S.W., or refugees, etc.we are doing “Gods Work”! – Blessings to those who see the large picture as ourChrist would have us do. Politics is not what is at stake here – clean water, for all,a decent way of life for all – these are moral values and our dear Episcopal churchhas for the most part stood by these morals. Thanks be to God. I am proud tobe Episcopalian for this very reason, Curate Diocese of Nebraska January 25, 2017 at 2:37 am Smart move. Welcome to prosperity and a real life. Daniel Jarvis says: January 30, 2017 at 8:13 pm Thanks Arden. As an Engineer, I see this happen all the time. To raise awareness, the opposition with the help of the press, develop a narrative that a group is being bullied/marginalizes and reinforcing this notion by challenging the do diligence of the design. The design effort could have followed all the laws and environment concerns and accomplished by faith based individuals but some how they are cursed and the good effort gets buried by the narrative. Basing “holy work” on someone’s narrative and not the facts or issues is troubling. We are all seekers of the God’s truth. Social justice issues seems to bring out division and either/or as opposite to both/and. Has anyone felt that inclusiveness is a buzz word that means think like me. Submit a Press Release This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Shreveport, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Pjcabbiness says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Jobs & Calls February 14, 2017 at 9:50 am ECUSA is clearly and openly left of center politically. That is a given. Interestingly, however, on the one hand we preach the solace of God’s eternal and unknowable plan while on the other we clearly “see” God’s hand in the positions we individually or corporately take. For anyone to claim that the Episcopal communion, or any other group or person, is definitively “doing God’s work” is much better informed than most. We have nothing more than opinions and, mostly, biases. And, we like nothing more than “being right.” If taking a political position makes you feel good or justified, examine it. If it gives you pleasure to oppose politics other than what you wish to identify with, examine it. If the Episcopal community were so righteous as it sometimes postures itself, it would have been on the front lines when the Ten Commandments were drummed out of public life, or when privately sponsored public prayer, and particularly prayer in schools, was declared anathema. Those positions, and many others like them defending the Gospel message, are, in my biased opinion, where the battle is being lost. This pipeline issue is at bottom simply part of the anti-oil crusade. Be anti-oil if you wish, but don’t use a thoroughly vetted public/private construction project as a stalking horse. And keep in mind that the world currently has at least a twenty-year forward need for fossil fuel supplies, even if useable large-scale alternate propulsion methodologies were uncovered today. Continue to develop the cleaner energy technologies – I’m certainly for that. But don’t forget the fuel tanks of those indigenous tribesmen’s pickup trucks or vital economic impact of long-haul truckers as you create more and more expensive gasoline and diesel fuel, or, for that matter, jet fuel the next time you board an airplane to go the a church conclave to demonstrate “doing God’s work.” Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Pittsburgh, PA Press Release Service AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Events Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Stephen Kratovil says: January 27, 2017 at 2:56 am Michael, I appreciate your reply. We all have to follow our hearts regarding how best to serve the Lord. If for you that means getting involved politically , fine. All I ask is that you respect the people who take a more traditional approach. They are not hiding behind stained glass windows any more than you are. They have their own way of expressing their faith, just as you do. And I will leave it at that. Let me wish you in advance a happy Lent. Rector Smithfield, NC January 29, 2017 at 12:42 am I have been an Episcopalian since the cradle, and the church’s active engagement in social justice is the primary reason why I proudly remain in the fold. In the present political climate in the U.S., the “left” is good and just, and the “right” is evil. If the church were to stand with the “right” side of the political spectrum, I would ditched it long ago. Youth Minister Lorton, VA margaret jones says: Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit an Event Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS January 25, 2017 at 3:10 am This nation is finally moving in the right direction! Thank you Lord. Bill Louis says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group February 13, 2017 at 11:52 am Michael:You’re entitled to your political beliefs, but to cloak leftist activism as God’s “holy work” is rather presumptuous. I guess God speaks directly to you, and you have received a personal message that God doesn’t want an oil pipeline.The Episcopalian leadership has turned political, which is the reason disaffected members like myself have left the Episcopal Church. There is no leftist or political correctness issue that the Church does not weigh in on. To paraphrase the words of Huckleberry Finn, “I’ve seen the people who say they are going to heaven, and if they are going to be there, I don’t think I’ll try for it.”The Comments to this article, as well as other articles on ENS, reflect the disharmony and divisions caused by the actions of the Episcopal Church and its intolerance for anything that is not in line with its leftist agenda. Rather than call to resist, riot and protest, the call should be for unity, reconciliation and dialogue that avoids name-calling and vitriolic personal attacks. As far as good works are concerned, Stephen’s acts in “serving food and providing shelter” to the poor, which you demean and denigrate, are far more constructive than all of your rants and “holy work” proclamations.I have found another Church where I go home on Sundays enlightened rather than angry and frustrated. There is a sign at the door: “Please turn off your cell-phones and leave your umbrellas and politics at the door.” Standing Rock Terry Francis says: Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Dakota Access Pipeline, Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH January 24, 2017 at 7:23 pm I’ve been an Episcopalian all my life, as well as attending Episcopal schools, and I find the Church’s swing to the left on political matters and opining on secular matters and government policy, very disturbing. A significant numbers of my friends have left the church over this liberal political bias. I expect if the Church doesn’t change its incursion in political life, only Hollywood types and the far left liberal wing of the Progressives will only be the only potential members. Please get back to God’s work and welcome all of all different political persuasions and leave politics outside the Church door. Donald Trump, Arden R Olson says: January 25, 2017 at 2:36 am At last, we have a man who will lead and not take any fake information from these anarchists and rabble rousers. They have gotten all the money they can from the government and now they try a new tactic. Well, there is a new sheriff in town and he and his pardners mean business. Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Bath, NClast_img read more